My Dementia Diary 30 – Fragility

We are both fragile. My wife’s dementia makes her insecure and needy, easily upset by an angry word or errant action. My blindness has left me unable to do much of what I used to do, often leaving me frustrated with my limitations.

Our fragilities don’t mix well.

As my wife is no longer able to adapt rationally to most of what happens around her, including my behavior, it’s up to me to be the adult in the room, to control my responses, to avoid hitting her hot buttons. 

Painful experience has taught me what those buttons are. I’ve learned to respond immediately to her requests for attention, no matter how engrossed I might be in some project. It takes very little to cause a mental and emotional meltdown which results in a lengthy period  of comforting to restore harmony.

I still screw up, but I’ve learned how to avoid this anguish.

I’ve learned to be cheerful even when I’m not feeling it. I’ve learned to stuff anger and negative feelings that would set her off. And, I’ve learned such discipline is a good thing.

Stopping to make lunch instead of vanishing into an hours long obsessive compulsive writing frenzy is a good thing. Taking a break in the middle of the afternoon to walk with her and get an ice cream cone is a good thing. Pausing to enjoy my wife’s excited descriptions of hummingbirds flitting by the feeder is a good thing.

Being mindful of our fragility and letting my wife teach me how to live fully is a good thing.

tio stib

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My Dementia Diary 29 – My Kato

In the hilarious “Pink Panther” film series, the bumbling Inspector Clouseau has a valet named Kato. Beyond his man servant duties, Kato is tasked with keeping Clouseau on his toes, making sure the policeman’s mind is always keen, ready for anything.

Kato does this by surprising Clouseau at unforeseen moments. He jumps out from behind a curtain, drops from a chandelier, or appears inside a closet door. A fight ensues, and the two combatants proceed to destroy everything in sight as they battle each other.

I have my own Kato. Her name is Maria.

Fortunately, she is far less destructive than her movie namesake. However, She is equally silent, ever present, and constantly surprising me. Although my hearing is quite good, she has the uncanny knack of sneaking up unheard.

Bending down to tie my shoes, I’ll suddenly hear a voice in front of me, “do you need help?”

I’ll be immersed in a stream of warm water and the shower door will open, “are you okay?”

Then, there’s my breakfast routine. Being blind and needing to be organized, I’ll first set everything  I’ll need on the counter, bowls, spoons, measuring cup, fruit, hot cereal. Then, I’ll put a pot of water on the stove to boil. When it starts steaming, I’ll turn around for the hot cereal and…

The counter has been cleaned. Everything has been put away, often in unexpected places. My Kato has been busy.

“Do you love me?”

“Always.”

tio stib

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